Seven Lectures on Medieval Missions by Thomas Smith D.D.

These seven lectures on medieval missions include within their scope material on Clovis and Clotilda, Paternus, Columba, Augustine of Canterbury, Aidan, Columbanus, Brunehilde, Boniface, Willebrord, Anskar and Ramon Llull. They appear on-line thanks to Redcliffe College, who recently asked me to digitise 1,000 mission books from their library. This book is in the Public Domain.

Thomas Smith, Medieval Missions. Duff Missionary Lectures – First Series. Edinburgh: T & T Clark, 1880. Hbk. pp.279. [Click to download in PDF]

Preface

The Duff Missionary Lectureship has been instituted under the provisions of the will of the late Dr. Alexander Duff. In arranging for its foundation, his son has complied with the dying instructions of his father, deviating from these instructions only to the extent of designating the lectureship by his father’s name,-a deviation which, I venture to think, will be universally approved.

In terms of a trust-deed executed by Mr. Duff, a course of lectures, not fewer than six in number, ‘On some department of Foreign Missions or cognate subjects,’ is to be delivered once in every four years, each lecturer to give only one course. They are to be delivered in Edinburgh and repeated in Glasgow, or delivered in Glasgow and repeated in Edinburgh, or delivered and repeated in such other places as the trustees may direct. The lectures are then to be published, and copies are to be presented to certain libraries in this country, continental Europe, America, India, Africa, and Australia. The trustees are men belonging to different denominations, and the lecturer is to be ‘ a minister, professor, or godly layman of any Evangelical Church.’

In the introduction to the first lecture I have sufficiently explained the circumstances in/ which I was appointed as the first holder of the lectureship, as having been long associated with Dr. Duff in mission work in Bengal, and afterwards in the home-management of the missions of the Free Church of Scotland. While I venture to entertain a humble hope that the present volume may communicate to its readers a considerable portion of information, and may stimulate their interest in the great work of missions, I desire that it may be regarded also as a tribute to the memory of one for whom, during forty years of uninterrupted friendship and constant intercourse, I cherished feelings of tenderest affection, while I shared with the universal church the sentiment of admiration of his gifts and veneration of his graces. [Continue reading]

History of Medieval Missions by George Maclear

George Frederick Maclear [1833-1902], A History of Christian Missions During the Middle AgesGeorge Maclear’s History of the Christian Mission in the Middle Ages records the spread of Christianity in Europe and beyond from 340 to 1520 AD. Along the way he discussed the contributions to mission made by St. Columba, St. Patrick, Augustine of Canterbury and St. Boniface. Works on this period are fairly rare, so it nice to be able to make one available in this way. This book is in the Public Domain.

George Frederick Maclear [1833-1902], A History of Christian Missions During the Middle Ages. Cambridge & London: MacMillan & Co, 1863. Hbk. pp.466. [Click to download in PDF]

Contents

Introduction

  1. The Mission Field of the Middle Ages
  2. Early efforts of the Church among the new races. A.D. 340-308
  3. The Church of Ireland, and the Mission of St. Patrick. A.D. 431-490
  4. St. Columba and the Conversion of the Picts
  5. Mission of St. Augustine to England. A.D. 596-627
  6. Progress of Missionary work in England. A.D. 627-689
  7. Celtuc Missionaries in Southern Germany. A.D. 592-630
  8. Missionary efforts in Friesland and parts adjacent. A.D. 628-719
  9. St. Boniface and the conversion of Germany. A.D. 715-755
  10. Efforts of the Disciples of St. Boniface. A.D. 719-789
  11. Missionary efforts in Denmark and Sweden. A.D. 800-1011
  12. The conversion of Norway. A.D. 900-1030
  13. Missions among the Slavic or Slavonic Races. A.D. 800-1000
  14. The conversion of Poland and Pomeronia. A.D. 1000-1127
  15. Conversion of Wendland, Prussia, and Lithuania. A.D. 1050-1410
  16. Missions to the Saracens and the Mongols. A.D. 1200-1400
  17. Compulsory Conversion of the Jews and Moors. A.D. 1400-1500
  18. Retrospect and Reflections
  19. Retrospect and Reflections

Introduction

On two occasions in the recorded history of the Apostle Paul, we behold him brought into contact with pure barbarism. The first is that familiar one when having been driven from the great towns of central Asia :Minor, he had in company with Barnabas, penetrated into the region of Lystra and Derbe. The district here indicated was, as is known to all, inhabited by a rude population, amongst whom the civilization of imperial Rome had scarcely penetrated. The natives of these two little towns situated amidst the bare and barren steppes of Lycaonia, spoke a dialect of their own, and were addicted to a rude and primitive superstition. Theirs was not the philosophical faith of the educated classses at Rome or Athens. It was the superstition of simple pagan villagers on whom the Jewish synagogue had produced little or no impression. [Continue reading]

Conference on Modern Religious History

Conference on Modern Religious History

Division of History and Politics

University of Stirling

Tuesday 14 June  – Wednesday 15 June 2016

Programme

Tuesday 14 June

 1.00     Lunch

2.00     Session I

Stewart J. Brown, Professor of Ecclesiastical History, University of Edinburgh:

‘British Imperial Christianity in the Nineteenth Century: The Anglican Established Church in India’

3.15     Refreshment Break

3.45     Session II

Clyde Binfield, Emeritus Professor of History, University of Sheffield:

‘J. H. Whitley and the Congregational Mindset’

5.00     Conclusion of Day

 

Wednesday 15 June

9.00     Session III

Eugenio Biagini, Professor of Modern and Contemporary History, University of Cambridge, and Fellow of Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge:

‘“Patrick, the First Churchman” in the Protestant Vision of Ernest Bateman of Booterstown, Dublin (1886-1979)’

10.15   Refreshment Break

10.45   Session IV

Mary Heimann, Professor of Modern History, Cardiff University:

‘St Francis and the Modern Imagination’

12.00   Lunch

1.00     Session V

Callum Brown, Professor of Late Modern European History, University of Glasgow:

‘Becoming Atheist: How Scots Lost Religion in the Twentieth Century’

2.15     Refreshment Break

2.45     Session VI

Kenneth D. Brown, Professor Emeritus of History, Queen’s University, Belfast:

‘William and Herbert Gladstone: Father and Son’

4.00     Conclusion of Conference

 

Attendance is open to all and free, but booking by Wednesday 8 June is essential.

Lunch each day will cost £10, to be paid on the day.

Ireland and the Celtic Church online

George T Stokes, Ireland and the Celtic ChurchOne of the fruits of a visit to Book Aid over the Christmas holiday was the following book on the history of the Celtic Church in Ireland. It contains 17 lectures on St. Patrick, St. Columba, Columbanus and the Pascal controversy by George T. Stokes. Stokes was Professor of Ecclesiastical History at the University of Dublin. The full text, being in the Public Domain, is now available for free download in PDF.

George T. Stokes [1843-1898], Ireland and the Celtic Church. A History of Ireland From St. Patrick to the English Conquest in 1172, 6th revised edn. London: SPCK, 1907. Hbk. pp.382. Click to download it here.

The book contained the following piece of emphemera:

Ephemera from George T. Stokes

As you can see, this indicates that the book was originally sent as a review copy. However, as many of the page-edges were still uncut, I would deduce that it was never read and that a review was not written. So, this is the first time that this copy has been fully opened since it was published 1907! Hopefully it will be read by many people now.

Perhaps someone could please add a link to the online version of the book to Prof. G.T. Stoke’s Wikipedia page?

Contents

Lecture 1 – The Ancient Celtic Church

Lecture 2 – St. Patrick

Lecture 3 – St. Patrick’s Mission

Lecture 4 – Tara and the Conversion of Ireland

Lecture 5 – St. Columba

Lecture 6 – Columba in Iona

Lecture 7 – Columbanus

Lecture 8 – The Paschal Controversy

Lecture 9 – Ireland and the East

Lecture 10 – The Social Life of the Eighth Century

Lecture 11 – Greek and Hebrew in Irish Monasteries

Lecture 12 – The Round – Towers of Ireland

Lecture 13 – The Danish Invasion of Ireland and the Pagan Crusade

Lecture 14 – The Danish Kingdom of Dublin

Lecture 15 – Brian Boru and the Triumph of Christianity

Lecture 16 -The See of Dublin and Union With England

Lecture 17 – St. Malachy and the See of Armagh