History of Medieval Missions by George Maclear

George Frederick Maclear [1833-1902], A History of Christian Missions During the Middle AgesGeorge Maclear’s History of the Christian Mission in the Middle Ages records the spread of Christianity in Europe and beyond from 340 to 1520 AD. Along the way he discussed the contributions to mission made by St. Columba, St. Patrick, Augustine of Canterbury and St. Boniface. Works on this period are fairly rare, so it nice┬áto be able to make one available in this way. This book is in the Public Domain.

George Frederick Maclear [1833-1902], A History of Christian Missions During the Middle Ages. Cambridge & London: MacMillan & Co, 1863. Hbk. pp.466. [Click to download in PDF]

Contents

Introduction

  1. The Mission Field of the Middle Ages
  2. Early efforts of the Church among the new races. A.D. 340-308
  3. The Church of Ireland, and the Mission of St. Patrick. A.D. 431-490
  4. St. Columba and the Conversion of the Picts
  5. Mission of St. Augustine to England. A.D. 596-627
  6. Progress of Missionary work in England. A.D. 627-689
  7. Celtuc Missionaries in Southern Germany. A.D. 592-630
  8. Missionary efforts in Friesland and parts adjacent. A.D. 628-719
  9. St. Boniface and the conversion of Germany. A.D. 715-755
  10. Efforts of the Disciples of St. Boniface. A.D. 719-789
  11. Missionary efforts in Denmark and Sweden. A.D. 800-1011
  12. The conversion of Norway. A.D. 900-1030
  13. Missions among the Slavic or Slavonic Races. A.D. 800-1000
  14. The conversion of Poland and Pomeronia. A.D. 1000-1127
  15. Conversion of Wendland, Prussia, and Lithuania. A.D. 1050-1410
  16. Missions to the Saracens and the Mongols. A.D. 1200-1400
  17. Compulsory Conversion of the Jews and Moors. A.D. 1400-1500
  18. Retrospect and Reflections
  19. Retrospect and Reflections

Introduction

On two occasions in the recorded history of the Apostle Paul, we behold him brought into contact with pure barbarism. The first is that familiar one when having been driven from the great towns of central Asia :Minor, he had in company with Barnabas, penetrated into the region of Lystra and Derbe. The district here indicated was, as is known to all, inhabited by a rude population, amongst whom the civilization of imperial Rome had scarcely penetrated. The natives of these two little towns situated amidst the bare and barren steppes of Lycaonia, spoke a dialect of their own, and were addicted to a rude and primitive superstition. Theirs was not the philosophical faith of the educated classses at Rome or Athens. It was the superstition of simple pagan villagers on whom the Jewish synagogue had produced little or no impression. [Continue reading]